Who Don’t You See?

We’ve all had the experience. You’re cruising down the interstate when the car slightly in front of you swerves into your lane barreling dangerously close to the side of your car. Your adrenaline races and you sit on the horn. He swerves away and gives you an apologetic wave or some other less friendly gesture. Either you have encountered a lunatic intent on driving you off the road or, more likely, a negligent driver who didn’t check his blind spot. Thus the expression, “I never saw it coming!”

If you’re really honest you’d have to admit that you’ve done the same. We all have! We’ve all neglected our blind spot and heard the all too familiar loud honk of a horn or the sickening sound of scraping metal and increased insurance premiums!

In a sense, all of humanity was born with blind spots. Jesus described those living outside of his divine light as having eyes that don’t see and ears that don’t hear.

Even David, a man recognized as being after God’s heart, acknowledged his blind spots, if you will. He called them “hidden faults” (Ps. 19:12). These were sins outside of his realm of awareness, but were sins nonetheless. Even though he could not, or chose not, to list them, they were there. They were real.

Jesus was particularly hard on religious leaders with blind spots. On more than one occasion He pointed out their blindness and their apparent contentment with it.

Unlike His creation, Jesus doesn’t have a blind spot. His awareness of people and His surroundings challenges those of us who claim to be his followers.

Jesus sees individuals amidst the masses.

Jesus feels – He never became calloused but instead, felt compassion.

Jesus calls us to get involved.

Luke reminds us of an occasion where it was late in the afternoon but the crowds were still hanging out with Jesus. The disciples, probably tired from a long day, urged Jesus to send them away so they couldget something to eat and find a place to stay. They were more than likely surprised by Jesus’ response,“You give them something to eat.” In other words, don’t just dismiss the crowd because you’re tired. Don’t take the convenient route and let them figure it out on their own. Don’t pretend you don’t see who’s right in front of you and their needs –you do something.

Who’s in your blind spot?

Who’s right in front of you but you want to dismiss them to fend for themselves?

The disciples said, “Send them away.” Jesus said, “You do something today.”

But what can we do? One strategy is Here for You.

Here for You is an attempt to do something for the masses who are right in front of us as well as those in our blind spots. It would easy to say, budgets are down, we’re already doing all we can. Let someone else address the needs. But Jesus is calling us to do something – now. Like those blind-spot moments on the roads, spiritual blind spots can be deadly. When believers knowingly, or unknowingly, fail to recognize the needs of the lost, the consequences are devastating.

Right now, Louisiana Baptists are seeing and connecting with people in the blind spots. Using current communication platformswe’re sharing the bread of life with those who hunger for more than this chaotic world offers. And Jesus multiplies the message to –not just 5,000 –but hundreds of thousands of people as they receive a gospel seed via their smart phones, tablets, televisions, and social media platforms. But we need help passing out bread to the spiritually hungry. Would you consider helping pass the bread?

Visit LouisianaBaptists.org/hereforyou and enter the password, luke1423. There you’ll find how your church, no matter how small or how large, can begin to share the Bread of Life with every person on a regular basis through Here for You.

Jesus sees the masses.

Jesus notices the individuals.

Jesus calls on us to do what we can.

Join us.